Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
Enhanced electrical energy storage may result from professor's research

Supercapacitors are known as the "sprinters" among electrical energy storage devices, able to deliver energy much faster and more efficiently than batteries, but usually holding much less electrical charge, while batteries are like marathon runners, delivering energy slowly, but steadily.
by Staff Writers
Austin TX (SPX) May 17, 2011
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering have created a new porous, three-dimensional carbon that can be used as a greatly enhanced supercapacitor, holding promise for energy storage in everything from energy grids and electric cars to consumer electronics.

The findings of the group, led by materials science and mechanical engineering Professor Rodney S. Ruoff, will be published by Science magazine in its online publication ScienceXpress.

The significance of the discovery by Ruoff's team, which included postdoctoral fellow Dr. Yanwu Zhu and graduate students Shanthi Murali and Meryl Stoller, is the potential it offers for enabling supercapacitors to deliver significantly more charge, opening the doors to many potential unprecedented uses for this type of electrical energy storage device.

Supercapacitors are known as the "sprinters" among electrical energy storage devices, able to deliver energy much faster and more efficiently than batteries, but usually holding much less electrical charge, while batteries are like marathon runners, delivering energy slowly, but steadily.

"We synthesized a new sponge-like carbon that has a surface area of up to 3,100 square meters per gram (two grams has a surface area roughly equivalent to that of a football field). It also has much higher electrical conductivity and, when further optimized, will be superb for thermal management as well," Ruoff said. "The processes used to make this porous carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

"After we realized that we had a new carbon with a highly novel structure that showed superb performance as an electrode, we knew that this direction of research - to create carbon materials that consist of a continuous three-dimensional porous network with single-atom-thick walls - was likely to yield the optimum electrode material for supercapacitors."

The University of Texas at Austin's Office of Technology Commercialization has filed a patent with the U.S. Patent Office on behalf of the inventors.

"Rod and his team define what we mean when we talk about innovation to address grand challenges," said Gregory L. Fenves, dean of the Cockrell School of Engineering. "This team of students, researchers and faculty has discovered a way to improve the efficiency of supercapacitor energy storage."

Ruoff's research team of about 40 people collaborated with faculty and students from The University of Texas at Dallas, scientific staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York and staff members at QuantaChrome Instruments in Florida.

The process used by the university team to synthesize the carbon material involved using microwaves to exfoliate graphite oxide, followed by treatment with potassium hydroxide, which created a carbon full of tiny holes - essentially a sponge that, when combined with an electrolyte, can store a giant electrical charge.

The team at Brookhaven then analyzed the atomic structure of the carbon material at the nanoscale using very high resolution electron microscopes. Their observations confirmed Ruoff's hypothesis that the carbon was a new three-dimensional material having highly curved, single-atom-thick walls that form tiny pores.



Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of Texas at Austin
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


ENERGY TECH
Fatal Beijing factory fire sparked by electric bike
Beijing (AFP) April 26, 2011
A deadly fire that swept through an illegally constructed Beijing building this week, killing 17 poor migrants, was triggered by an electric tricycle, state media said Tuesday. Another 25 people were hurt in the fire that broke out in the early hours of Monday morning in the four-storey building in the capital's southern Daxing district, the state-run Xinhua news agency said. Xinhua quot ... read more







ENERGY TECH
Britain eyes 50-percent carbon emissions cut target

Summer energy crunch for China?

Nobel winners put humanity on trial at sustainability talks

Japan to review strategies for energy, economy after quake

ENERGY TECH
Coal power still reigns in Australia

Scientists suggest independent monitoring of deep-sea hydrocarbon industry

Australia's reliance on polluting coal surges

Researchers identify extensive methane leaks under streets of Boston

ENERGY TECH
Evolutionary lessons for wind farm efficiency

Global warming won't harm wind energy production, climate models predict

Study: Warming won't lessen wind energy

Mortenson Construction to Build its 100th Wind Project

ENERGY TECH
New solar product captures up to 95 percent of light energy

New Barometer published: photovoltaic barometer

Emerson To Provide Power Technology For One Of The Largest Solar Energy Projects In US

Lowe's Selects Sungevity For Residential Solar Partnership

ENERGY TECH
Experts monitor nuclear plant in quake-prone Armenia

Moody's downgrades Japan's TEPCO

Moody's downgrades Japan's TEPCO

Japan shuts down atomic plant in quake danger zone

ENERGY TECH
Multi-junction solar cells help turn plants into powerhouses

Eucalyptus tree genome deciphered

Turning plants into power houses

Counteracting Biofuel Toxicity in Microbes

ENERGY TECH
Top Chinese scientists honored with naming of minor planets

China sees smooth preparation for launch of unmanned module

China to attempt first space rendezvous

Countdown begins for Chineses space station program

ENERGY TECH
ECOS reviews proposed 'Carbon Farming Initiative'

Drought halts shipping on China's Yangtze

Britain 'in drought conditions' amid European heatwave

Chemistry curbs spreading of carbon dioxide


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement