Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Energy News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ENERGY TECH
Scientists build bacteria-powered battery on single sheet of paper
by Staff Writers
Binghamton NY (SPX) Dec 23, 2016


Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper that can power disposable electronics. Image courtesy Seokheun. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Instead of ordering batteries by the pack, we might get them by the ream in the future. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper that can power disposable electronics. The manufacturing technique reduces fabrication time and cost, and the design could revolutionize the use of bio-batteries as a power source in remote, dangerous and resource-limited areas.

"Papertronics have recently emerged as a simple and low-cost way to power disposable point-of-care diagnostic sensors," said Assistant Professor Seokheun "Sean" Choi, who is in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department within the Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science. He is also the director of the Bioelectronics and Microsystems Lab at Binghamton.

"Stand-alone and self-sustained, paper-based, point-of-care devices are essential to providing effective and life-saving treatments in resource-limited settings," said Choi.

On one half of a piece of chromatography paper, Choi and PhD candidate Yang Gao, who is a co-author of the paper, placed a ribbon of silver nitrate underneath a thin layer of wax to create a cathode. The pair then made a reservoir out of a conductive polymer on the other half of the paper, which acted as the anode. Once properly folded and a few drops of bacteria-filled liquid are added, the microbes' cellular respiration powers the battery.

"The device requires layers to include components, such as the anode, cathode and PEM (proton exchange membrane)," said Choi. "[The final battery] demands manual assembly, and there are potential issues such as misalignment of paper layers and vertical discontinuity between layers, which ultimately decrease power generation."

Different folding and stacking methods can significantly improve power and current outputs. Scientists were able to generate 31.51 microwatts at 125.53 microamps with six batteries in three parallel series and 44.85 microwatts at 105.89 microamps in a 6x6 configuration.

It would take millions of paper batteries to power a common 40-watt light bulb, but on the battlefield or in a disaster situation, usability and portability is paramount. Plus, there is enough power to run biosensors that monitor glucose levels in diabetes patients, detect pathogens in a body or perform other life-saving functions.

"Among many flexible and integrative paper-based batteries with a large upside, paper-based microbial fuel cell technology is arguably the most underdeveloped," said Choi. "We are excited about this because microorganisms can harvest electrical power from any type of biodegradable source, like wastewater, that is readily available. I believe this type of paper biobattery can be a future power source for papertronics."

The innovation is the latest step in paper battery development by Choi. His team developed its first paper prototype in 2015, which was a foldable battery that looked much like a matchbook. Earlier this year they unveiled a design that was inspired by a ninja throwing star.

The current work is available online in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies and will be presented at the IEEE MEMS 2017 conference in Las Vegas, Nevada on Jan. 22-26.

Research Report


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

.


Related Links
Binghamton University
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ENERGY TECH
Scientists turn to AI to create safer lithium-ion batteries
Stanford CA (SPX) Dec 20, 2016
Scientists have spent decades searching for a safe alternative to the flammable liquid electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries. Now Stanford University researchers have identified nearly two-dozen solid electrolytes that could someday replace the volatile liquids used in smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices. The results, based on techniques adapted from artificial intellige ... read more


ENERGY TECH
MIT Energy Initiative report provides guidance for evolving electric power sector

Toward energy solutions for northern regions

Energy-hungry Asia slowing down, lender says

US push to low-carbon future 'unstoppable': Biden

ENERGY TECH
Scientists boost catalytic activity for key chemical reaction in fuel cells

Lower cost of LEDs reduce profitability for manufacturing landscape

Scientists turn to AI to create safer lithium-ion batteries

Could a seawater battery help end our dependence on lithium?

ENERGY TECH
Offshore wind makes U.S. debut

Apple invests in China wind farms

German energy company plants wind farm seed in Texas

New York to bid in Federal Offshore Wind Auction

ENERGY TECH
Tenth Year of Consecutive Global Growth for PV Demand, IHS Markit Says

Saudi Vision 2030 Gives Boost to Solar Energy Investors

Canadian Solar Subsidiary Recurrent Energy Completes 200 Megawatt Garland Solar Facility

EDF EN France chooses Trina Solar modules for its PV plant in Fos sur Mer

ENERGY TECH
Japan pulls plug on troubled fast breeder reactor

Bulgaria seeks investor to revive nuclear project

Japan switches on nuclear reactor after safety shutdown

Fukushima costs to double to nearly $180 bn: report

ENERGY TECH
Ultrafast lasers reveal light-harvesting secrets of photosynthetic algae

People willing to pay more for new biofuels

Investing in the 'bioeconomy' could create jobs and reduce carbon emissions

Argonne researchers study how reflectivity of biofuel crops impacts climate

ENERGY TECH
Gas prices moving higher alongside oil prices

The deepwater horizon aftermath

Additional drilling slated for Leviathan gas field

California officials challenge fracking off coastline

ENERGY TECH
Glee to gloom: Climate and the 'Trump effect'

'Fear is palpable' among US climate scientists over Trump moves

Warmer temps may not affect carbon stored deep in northern peatlands

Scientists measure impact of local weather on global climate patterns




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement