Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
Seebeck thermoelectric device achieves higher conversion efficiency
by Staff Writers
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Apr 29, 2016


Development of a low-cost, high-performance ferromagnetic alloy and significant improvement in thermoelectric conversion efficiency. Conventionally, expensive platinum was used as the electrode material to extract electric power in a spin Seebeck thermoelectric device. This time, new cobalt alloys were developed to replace the platinum. As a result, the cost was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the combination of the thermoelectric effect termed the "Anomalous Nernst Effect," appearing due to the ferromagnetic properties added to the cobalt alloys and the spin Seebeck effect, have improved the thermoelectric conversion efficiency by more than 10 times. Image courtesy NEC Corporation. For a larger version of this image please go here.

A thermoelectric (TE) device using cutting edge thermoelectric conversion technology has been created by a team comprising NEC Corporation, NEC TOKIN Corporation and Tohoku University. The new technology, known as the spin Seebeck effect, has conversion efficiency 10 times higher than the conventional method.

Thermoelectric conversion technology that converts energy abandoned as waste heat back to electric power could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Although conventional spin Seebeck thermoelectric devices have the advantage of low manufacturing costs and high versatility and durability, their energy conversion efficiency is inferior.

"We have improved the conversion efficiency of this spin Seebeck thermoelectric device by more than 10 times because of its newly developed material and device structure," says Soichi Tsumura, General Manager, IoT Device Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation. "Furthermore, devices made of flexible material, such as resin, have been achieved using a manufacturing process that does not require high-temperature heat treatment."

"The conversion efficiency of this new spin thermoelectric device has been improved by almost one million times when compared to the earliest device, and has taken an important step towards practical use as a generator element. The achievement of practical use as a heat flux sensor is also in sight," says Tsumura.

The three parties aim to further the research and development of technologies to generate electricity from the large amount of waste heat emitted by things such as plants, data centers and vehicles.

These results were achieved as part of the "Saitoh Spin Quantum Rectification Project" led by Tohoku University Professor Eiji Saitoh. It is funded by the Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) program of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST).


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Tohoku University
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ENERGY TECH
Creation of Jupiter interior, a step towards room temp superconductivity
Osaka, Japan (SPX) Dec 21, 2015
Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and a major component of stars such as the Sun, as well as gas-giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. In recent years, hydrogen's behavior at high temperature and high pressure has been in the realm of interest not only for planetary science, but also for fields such as materials science for the purpose of achieving a hydrogen energy soci ... read more


ENERGY TECH
Could off-grid electricity systems accelerate energy access

Changing the world, 1 fridge at a time

EU court overturns carbon market free quotas

Global leaders agree to set price on carbon pollution

ENERGY TECH
Seebeck thermoelectric device achieves higher conversion efficiency

Anomalous sinking of spheres in apparently fixed powder beds discovered

Quantum sensors for high-precision magnetometry of superconductors

Creation of Jupiter interior, a step towards room temp superconductivity

ENERGY TECH
Report: U.S. wind energy sector booming

El Hierro, the Spanish island vying for 100% clean energy

USGS finds cranes isolated from wind farms

Iowa puts faith in wind energy

ENERGY TECH
NREL finds nanotube semiconductors well-suited for PV systems

Joint Venture to Build 1000 Megawatts of Solar Across China

Spain's Abengoa to shed more jobs on top of 10,000 already gone

U.S. throws more money at solar power

ENERGY TECH
Ancient glass-glued walls studied for nuke waste solutions

India's Mainland to Host Next Hub of Nuclear Plants

German power giants to pay into public fund to finance nuclear phase-out

BWXT tapped for nuclear reactor components, fuel

ENERGY TECH
Weltec Biopower presents solutions for energy from waste and wastewater

Making biodiesel with used cooking oil and a microwave

Major advance in synthetic biochemistry holds promise for biofuels

Recyclable, sugar-derived foam as renewable alternative to polyurethanes

ENERGY TECH
China's space technology extraordinary, impressive says Euro Space Center director

China can meet Chile's satellite needs: ambassador

China launches Kunpeng-1B sounding rocket

South China city gears up for satellite tourism

ENERGY TECH
Carbon dioxide fertilization greening Earth, study finds

The United States absorbed carbon dioxide despite a drought

US climate-adaptation plans long on ideas, short on details, priorities

Ancient marine sediments provide clues to future climate change




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement