Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY NEWS
New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change
By Catherine TRIOMPHE
New York (AFP) March 26, 2017


With a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable.

But the American Copper Buildings going up on the East River -- a complex of two towers with 764 apartments, panoramic views and a huge entrance hall with a doorman -- is different.

Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection.

The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.

JDS, the company developing the American Copper Buildings, bought the land for the project around the same time.

"The whole thing was a lake, we could have toured the site in a canoe," said Simon Koster, a principal at the company.

"We knew something like that would happen again," he added. "So we said, 'How can we make sure that if we lived here, we will not be facing that scenario?' So we let the designers loose."

- Tools to survive -

One of the main innovations was to ensure residents have access to electricity as long as possible in the event of an outage in the city.

Instead of planning an opulent penthouse on the top floor, the architects reserved space for big natural-gas generators designed to keep key equipment functioning if the power fails.

Although the machines are situated "in the most valuable real estate of this building," Koster said, "it makes all the other units all the more valuable."

"We are going to have more of these events, it's just being strategic and smart about how you prepare for them," architect Gregg Pasquarelli said.

"If we lose power, if you can go up and down in the elevator and your refrigerator works and you have one outlet available that you charge your phone on, you can probably survive in New York for a week," he added.

Every kitchen has two electrical outlets -- one reserved for refrigerators -- connected to a back-up circuit fed by the generators. That means smartphones can be charged during a breakdown.

Traditionally relegated to the basement, the heating, ventilation and large electrical equipment have been installed on the first floor instead, more than 20 feet (seven meters) above the street to minimize the risk of flooding.

The main entrance hall is large and austere, with steel pillars and floor tiling designed for outside use.

Wood-paneled walls warm the atmosphere -- but the open side panels can dry easily with no damage in the event of flooding.

The building's cheapest studios will be available for rent starting from $3,000 a month, and include the luxury perks of access to a swimming pool and huge terrace with views of the Empire State Building in addition to the more prosaic bonus of flood resistance.

- Embracing resilience -

New York is embracing resilient architecture more than most cities in the country because its exorbitantly priced real estate drives up the financial stakes, says Alex Wilson, president of the Vermont-based Resilient Design Institute, which specializes in such issues.

Besides electricity, architects are also coming up with ways of providing drinking water -- with accessible faucets for everyone now obligatory on lower floors -- as well as maintaining reasonable temperatures.

In the event of a summer power outage, "a lot of condominiums are heavily glazed and would become inhabitable," Wilson said.

The city is identifying the most vulnerable existing buildings for adaptation.

However, the obstacles for reconstructing older structures are greater than integrating flood resistance during the construction of new projects such as the Copper Buildings -- and so are the costs -- Wilson said.

Politics may also get in the way. The Trump administration plans to slash the Environmental Protection Agency's budget, which may affect the collection of data to assess weak infrastructure.

"If the government stops collecting the data on flooding vulnerabilities, heat waves, then it's going to be harder for the design and development communities to incorporate changes in their design," Wilson said.

Still, he's optimistic the government's rejection of science about the effects of climate change will have only a temporary effect.

"The private sector is well aware of this, the insurance industry is increasingly aware of this and these industries will continue to drive progress in resilience."

ENERGY NEWS
CO2 stable for 3rd year despite global growth: IEA
Paris (AFP) March 17, 2017
Global carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector held stable for the third straight year in 2016 despite the global economy continuing to expand, the International Energy Agency said Friday. By far the main culprit in global warming, carbon dioxide emissions stood at 32.1 billion tonnes last year, the IEA estimated. This was the same level as the same as the previous two years, des ... read more

Related Links



Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ENERGY NEWS
CO2 stable for 3rd year despite global growth: IEA

Emissions flat for three years in a row, IEA says

New research urges a rethink on global energy subsidies

New Zealand lauded for renewables, but challenges remain

ENERGY NEWS
TU Graz researchers show that enzyme function inhibits battery ageing

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

New feedback system could allow greater control over fusion plasma

Headphone batteries explode on flight to Australia

ENERGY NEWS
North Carolina offshore wind hailed as job creator

North Carolina ready for offshore wind energy auction

Flagship English Channel wind farm nears completion

French, Spanish companies set for more wind power off coast of France

ENERGY NEWS
Revealing the microscopic mechanisms in perovskite solar cells

Dubai harvests desert sun at vast solar plant

New solar energy plant to be installed on Barbuda

Sea change needed for low-carbon economy

ENERGY NEWS
Loss-hit Toshiba nosedives on fears about future

The EIC and Nuclear AMRC sign MoU

German energy company RWE evolving for success

Potential approach to how radioactive elements could be 'fished out' of nuclear waste

ENERGY NEWS
Community in chaotic Jakarta goes green to fight eviction

Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants

NASA Study Confirms Biofuels Reduce Jet Engine Pollution

Scientists harness solar power to produce clean hydrogen from biomass

ENERGY NEWS
Norway's Statoil top bidder for U.S. offshore licenses

Putin insists Europe needs expanded gas pipeline

Fretting over U.S. economic fate dings oil prices

A new model for capillary rise in nano-channels offers insights into fracking

ENERGY NEWS
2017 already marked by climate extremes: UN

Climate change 'makes deadly China pollution worse'

A new study provides solid evidence for global warming

US climate scepticism clouds G20 meet




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement