Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Energy News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ENERGY TECH
Electroplating delivers high-energy, high-power batteries
by Staff Writers
Champaign IL (SPX) May 15, 2017


Illinois professor Paul Braun and Hailong Ning, the director of research and development at Xerion Advanced Battery Corporation, led a research team that developed a method for directly electroplating lithium-ion battery cathodes. Credit Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

The process that makes gold-plated jewelry or chrome car accents is now making powerful lithium-ion batteries.

Researchers at the University of Illinois, Xerion Advanced Battery Corporation and Nanjing University in China developed a method for electroplating lithium-ion battery cathodes, yielding high-quality, high-performance battery materials that could also open the door to flexible and solid-state batteries.

"This is an entirely new approach to manufacturing battery cathodes, which resulted in batteries with previously unobtainable forms and functionalities," said Paul V. Braun, a professor of materials science and engineering and director of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab at Illinois. He co-led the research group that published its findings in the journal Science Advances.

Traditional lithium-ion battery cathodes use lithium-containing powders formed at high temperatures. The powder is mixed with gluelike binders and other additives into a slurry, which is spread on a thin sheet of aluminum foil and dried. The slurry layer needs to be thin, so the batteries are limited in how much energy they can store. The glue also limits performance.

"The glue is not active. It doesn't contribute anything to the battery, and it gets in the way of electricity flowing in the battery," said co-author Hailong Ning, the director of research and development at Xerion Advanced Battery Corporation in Champaign, a startup company co-founded by Braun. "You have all this inactive material taking up space inside the battery, while the whole world is trying to get more energy and power from the battery."

The researchers bypassed the powder and glue process altogether by directly electroplating the lithium materials onto the aluminum foil.

Since the electroplated cathode doesn't have any glue taking up space, it packs in 30 percent more energy than a conventional cathode, according to the paper. It can charge and discharge faster as well, since the current can pass directly through it and not have to navigate around the inactive glue or through the slurry's porous structure. It also has the advantage of being more stable.

Additionally, the electroplating process creates pure cathode materials, even from impure starting ingredients. This means that manufacturers can use materials lower in cost and quality and the end product will still be high in performance, eliminating the need to start with expensive materials already brought up to battery grade, Braun said.

"This method opens the door to flexible and three-dimensional battery cathodes, since electroplating involves dipping the substrate in a liquid bath to coat it," said co-author Huigang Zhang, a former senior scientist at Xerion who is now a professor at Nanjing University.

The researchers demonstrated the technique on carbon foam, a lightweight, inexpensive material, making cathodes that were much thicker than conventional slurries. They also demonstrated it on foils and surfaces with different textures, shapes and flexibility.

"These designs are impossible to achieve by conventional processes," Braun said. "But what's really important is that it's a high-performance material and that it's nearly solid. By using a solid electrode rather than a porous one, you can store more energy in a given volume. At the end of the day, people want batteries to store a lot of energy."

Research Report: "Electroplating lithium transition metal oxides"

ENERGY TECH
Harnessing geometric frustration to tune batteries for greater power
Kent UK (SPX) May 15, 2017
A new generation of higher-powered batteries for phones and cameras could result from ground-breaking research led by scientists at the University of Kent. Researchers from the University's School of Physical Sciences (SPS), working with scientists from other European institutions, formulated a recipe to increase the rate at which a solid material - an artificial mineral - can conduct char ... read more

Related Links
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ENERGY TECH
Australia power grid leased to local-foreign consortium

Poland central to EU energy diversification strategy

Myanmar recovery linked to development of electrical grid

U.S. emissions generally lower last year

ENERGY TECH
Electroplating delivers high-energy, high-power batteries

Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the future

Understanding of superconductor's 'normal' state may help solve longstanding puzzle

Harnessing geometric frustration to tune batteries for greater power

ENERGY TECH
Scientists track porpoises to assess impact of offshore wind farms

Dutch open 'world's largest offshore' wind farm

OX2 will manage a 45 MW wind farm owned by IKEA Group in Lithuania

Building Energy celebrates the beginning of operations and electricity generation of its first wind farm

ENERGY TECH
Beaumont Solar Announces the Beaumont "Big C" Services Unit to Solar Industry

A record year for Swedish leading solar energy technology provider Midsummer

Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesign

Solar power not a favorite for New Zealand

ENERGY TECH
India to build 10 domestic nuclear power reactors

Japan restarts another reactor

Coatings for nuclear fuel preventing explosions in reactors, developed at TPU

South Africa to restart nuclear power plans

ENERGY TECH
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity

Genome sequence of fuel-producing alga announced

New breakthrough makes it easier to turn old coffee waste into cleaner biofuels

Enhancing the efficiency of cereal straw for biofuel production

ENERGY TECH
Oil prices fall on slow drain of supplies

Offshore, not shale, driving U.S. oil exports

More drilling on tap for North Sea

Oil development plans nearly ready for Senegal

ENERGY TECH
The EU: What happened to climate's poster child; Canada blocks audit change

Rising temperatures threaten stability of Tibetan alpine grasslands

New scrutiny of poles as world braces for climate shifts: UN

Tillerson: Trump will not rush US climate policy review




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement