Energy News  





. Co2 Storage In Coal Can Be Predicted Better

General illustration only of Co2 sequestration processes.
by Staff Writers
Amsterdam, Netherlands (SPX) Apr 17, 2007
CO2 storage in the ground is being considered increasingly more often in order to realise the climate and energy objectives. Dutch researcher Saikat Mazumder made it possible to better predict routes of the 'underground highways' along which gasses like carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) will move. Moreover, coal was found to be highly suitable for filtering carbon dioxide out of waste gasses and storing it.

The 'Enhanced Coalbed Methane process' kills two birds with one stone: carbon dioxide (CO2) is stored in coal seams in the ground and at the same time methane (CH4) is obtained from the process. To optimise this process it is important to know how coal retains and stores some fluids and gasses whilst allowing others through.

The network of cracks is essential for this. Mazumder developed a measuring technique using CT scans that led to an improved understanding of the patterns of cracks. He also did experiments with waste gas and pure CO2 to determine the uptake capacity of single and multi-component gasses. In both wet and dry experiments, CO2 was strongly absorbed and CH4 was released.

This methane production in a coal seam can vary over the course of time. Mazumder developed two estimating methods to gain a better understanding of this. When used together these could generate good predictions.

Problems due to swelling
The research revealed that a considerable quantity of CO2 could be removed from waste gas by allowing it to be adsorbed onto coal under high-pressure. According to Mazumder this means that the injection of waste gas into coal seams can be applied to filter out CO2 on an industrial scale and to retain it.

Mazumder also carried out a preliminary study into the decrease in porosity and permeability as a consequence of coal swelling due to the injection of CO2. The decrease in the permeability can give rise to serious injection problems in the area of the well into which CO2 is injected.

The doctoral research 'Dynamics of CO2 in Coal as a Reservoir' was, amongst other things, part of the programme 'Transition to sustainable use of fossil fuels' funded by the NWO/SenterNovem Stimulation Programme Energy Research. The programme aims to develop knowledge in the natural and social sciences for the transition to a sustainable energy supply.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com
Our Polluted World and Cleaning It Up
China News From SinoDaily.com
Global Trade News
The Economy
All About Solar Energy at SolarDaily.com
Civil Nuclear Energy Science, Technology and News
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Shanghai To Shut Down 29 Coal Power Plants By 2010
Shanghai (AFP) April 13, 2007
China's financial hub Shanghai plans to shut 29 coal-fired power plants by 2010 in a renewed bid to reduce environmentally damaging carbon emissions, state press reported Friday.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Shanghai To Shut Down 29 Coal Power Plants By 2010
  • Co2 Storage In Coal Can Be Predicted Better
  • UCLA Chemists Design Lowest-Density Crystals Ever For Use In Clean Energy
  • Researchers Find Large Is Smart When It Comes To Cities

  • G7 Ministers Give Nuclear Energy A Nod
  • Mitsubishi Corp Buys Uranium Rights In Canada
  • Japanese Nuclear Industry Vows Safety
  • Egypt And Russia Drafting Nuclear Cooperation Agreements

  • NASA Aims To Clear Up Mystery Of Elusive Clouds At Edge Of Space
  • University Of Colorado Instruments To Launch On NASA Cloud Mission
  • Powerful New Tool To Track Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide By Source
  • Sun-Warmed Air Pollution Flows East From Asia

  • Greenpeace Spotlights Rainforest Damage In DRC
  • Trees To Offset The Carbon Footprint
  • Light Shed On Long-Term Effects Of Logging After Wildfire
  • Invasive Grass May Impede Forest Regeneration

  • Winter Flounder On The Fast Track To Recovery
  • Satellite Images Aid Implementation Of Agricultural Reforms
  • Farmland Across China At Risk From Pollution
  • Anthropologist Finds Earliest Evidence Of Maize Farming In Mexico

  • Driverless Car Goes On Show In London
  • Made In USA Losing Cachet
  • Technique Creates Metal Memory And Could Lead To Vanishing Dents
  • Toyota Anticipates Sharp Increase In Its Hybrid Sales

  • Nondestructive Testing Keeps Bagram Aircraft Flying
  • New FAA Oceanic Air Traffic System Designed By Lockheed Martin Fully Operational
  • NASA Seeks New Research Proposals
  • Germans Urged To Give Foreign Travel A Rest To Curb Global Warming

  • Could NASA Get To Pluto Faster? Space Expert Says Yes - By Thinking Nuclear
  • NASA plans to send new robot to Jupiter
  • Los Alamos Hopes To Lead New Era Of Nuclear Space Tranportion With Jovian Mission
  • Boeing Selects Leader for Nuclear Space Systems Program

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement