Energy News  





. Africa Great Lakes Gas Project Will Defuse Underwater Timebomb

Lake Kivu sits in an area of high volcanic activity, and a large flow of lava into its waters could cause an explosion, prompting a catastrophe. The resulting disaster would be even worse than when gas escaped from Lake Nyos in Cameroon in August 1986 when carbon dioxide seeped out of the lake after an explosion and suffocated 1,800 people.
by Staff Writers
Kinshasa, DR Congo (AFP) April 4, 2007
With their recent agreement to extract methane gas from under Lake Kivu, one of Africa's Great Lakes, DR Congo and Rwanda hope not only to produce power but also to defuse a massive timebomb.

"The reserves are currently estimated at around 55 billion cubic metres (two trillion cubic feet)," said Celestin Kasereka, researcher at nearby Goma's volcanic observatory.

"The danger with the gas is that it is explosive when in a very strong concentration."

Around two million people live around the lake. If the methane exploded, carbon dioxide -- denser than air -- would be released, killing tens of thousands of people, Kasereka believes.

There is four times as much carbon dioxide under the lake as methane.

Lake Kivu sits in an area of high volcanic activity, and a large flow of lava into its waters could cause an explosion, prompting a catastrophe, Kasereka said.

When Mount Nyiragongo last erupted in 2002, the volcano spewed out 38 million cubic metres of lava, engulfing parts of the nearby city of Goma.

"If a similar amount went directly into the lake, at high velocity, that could reach the deep waters and cause a gas explosion," Kasereka said.

The resulting disaster would be even worse than when gas escaped from Lake Nyos in Cameroon in August 1986, Kasereka said, when carbon dioxide seeped out of the lake after an explosion and suffocated 1,800 people.

Taking out the gas would reduce the risk, although the joint Kigali-Kinshasa project, signed on March 28, is not scheduled to be operational before 2009.

The project could provide 500 megawatts of energy, supplying electricity to all those living around the 50-by-90-kilometre lake, said DRC's hydrocarbons minister Lambert Mende.

Source: Agence France-Presse

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com
Bring Order To A World Of Disasters
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Florida To Build Strongest Magnet Yet For Neutron Scattering Experiments
Tallahassee FL (SPX) Apr 05, 2007
The Hahn-Meitner Institute in Berlin has contracted with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and Florida State University to build an $8.7-million hybrid magnet for "neutron scattering" experiments. When finished in 2011, the new, high-field magnet, which is based on the magnet lab's Series-Connected Hybrid concept, will be housed at the Berlin Neutron Scattering Center.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Africa Great Lakes Gas Project Will Defuse Underwater Timebomb
  • Florida To Build Strongest Magnet Yet For Neutron Scattering Experiments
  • Biodiesel Study Targets Cleaner Air And Cleaner Engines
  • Equipment Failure At Top Particle Accelerator

  • Weighing The Financial Risks Of Nuclear Power Plants
  • Alstom And Atomenergomash Launch Joint Energy Venture In Russia
  • Automated Analyzer For Complex Nuclear Waste Provides Rapid Results
  • Scientists Unlock Physical And Chemical Secrets Of Plutonium

  • Powerful New Tool To Track Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide By Source
  • Sun-Warmed Air Pollution Flows East From Asia
  • Disaster Zone Declared As Thai Haze Reaches Dangerous Levels
  • Thailand Considers Declaring Emergency Over Haze

  • Australia Launches Fund To Stop Other Countries Cutting Down Their Own Trees
  • Indonesian Justice Attacked Over Illegal Logging
  • Uganda Approves Destruction Of Protected Rainforest
  • Cyclone Science Shows Rainforest Impacts And Recovery

  • Wine Industry Faces Major Challenge From Global Warming
  • Debating The Impact Of GM Crops 10 Years On
  • EU Must Cut Tuna Fishing By Half To Save Bluefin
  • Too Much Water And Fertilizer Bad For Plant Diversity

  • Technique Creates Metal Memory And Could Lead To Vanishing Dents
  • Toyota Anticipates Sharp Increase In Its Hybrid Sales
  • New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points To Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles
  • Geneva Show Hints At Green Fuel Jumble For Motorists

  • Nondestructive Testing Keeps Bagram Aircraft Flying
  • New FAA Oceanic Air Traffic System Designed By Lockheed Martin Fully Operational
  • NASA Seeks New Research Proposals
  • Germans Urged To Give Foreign Travel A Rest To Curb Global Warming

  • Could NASA Get To Pluto Faster? Space Expert Says Yes - By Thinking Nuclear
  • NASA plans to send new robot to Jupiter
  • Los Alamos Hopes To Lead New Era Of Nuclear Space Tranportion With Jovian Mission
  • Boeing Selects Leader for Nuclear Space Systems Program

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement