Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
A quick-destructing battery to power 'transient' devices
by Staff Writers
Ames IA (SPX) Aug 10, 2016


Iowa State scientists have developed a working battery that dissolves and disperses in water. Image courtesy Scientific illustration by Ashley Christopherson. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Self-destructing electronic devices could keep military secrets out of enemy hands. Or they could save patients the pain of removing a medical device. Or, they could allow environmental sensors to wash away in the rain.

Making such devices possible is the goal of a relatively new field of study called "transient electronics." These transient devices could perform a variety of functions - until exposure to light, heat or liquid triggers their destruction.

Reza Montazami, an Iowa State University assistant professor of mechanical engineering and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, has been working on transient technology for years. The latest development from his lab is a self-destructing, lithium-ion battery capable of delivering 2.5 volts and dissolving or dissipating in 30 minutes when dropped in water. The battery can power a desktop calculator for about 15 minutes.

Montazami said it's the first transient battery to demonstrate the power, stability and shelf life for practical use.

Montazami and his team recently published their discovery in the Journal of Polymer Science, Part B: Polymer Physics.

Study co-authors are Nastaran Hashemi, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering; Simge Cinar, a postdoctoral research associate; Yuanfen Chen and Reihaneh Jamshidi, graduate students; Kathryn White, a Department of Energy-Ames Laboratory intern; and Emma Gallegos, an undergraduate student.

Development of the transient battery was supported by funding from Iowa State's Presidential Initiative for Interdisciplinary Research and the department of mechanical engineering.

"Unlike conventional electronics that are designed to last for extensive periods of time, a key and unique attribute of transient electronics is to operate over a typically short and well-defined period, and undergo fast and, ideally, complete self-deconstruction and vanish when transiency is triggered," the scientists wrote in their paper.

And what about a transient device that depends on a standard battery?

"Any device without a transient power source isn't really transient," Montazami said. "This is a battery with all the working components. It's much more complex than our previous work with transient electronics."

Montazami's previous, proof-of-concept project involved electronics printed on a single layer of a degradable polymer composite. The transient battery is made up of eight layers, including an anode, a cathode and the electrolyte separator, all wrapped up in two layers of a polyvinyl alcohol-based polymer.

The battery itself is tiny - about 1 millimeter thick, 5 millimeters long and 6 millimeters wide. Montazami said the battery components, structure and electrochemical reactions are all very close to commercially developed battery technology.

But, when you drop it in water, the polymer casing swells, breaks apart the electrodes and dissolves away. Montazami is quick to say the battery doesn't completely disappear. The battery contains nanoparticles that don't degrade, but they do disperse as the battery's casing breaks the electrodes apart.

He calls that "physical-chemical hybrid transiency."

And what about applications that require a longer-lasting charge? Larger batteries with higher capacities could provide more power, but they also take longer to self-destruct, according to the scientists' paper. The paper suggests applications requiring higher power levels could be connected to several smaller batteries.

Even though batteries are tried-and-tested technology, Montazami said the transient battery project presented three major challenges for his research group.

First, he said the battery had to produce voltage similar to commercial batteries because many devices won't operate if voltage is low or unsteady. Second, the batteries require multiple layers and a complex structure. And third, fabricating the batteries was difficult and took repeated attempts.

And what kept the group working through all that?

"The materials science part of this," Montazami said. "This is a challenging materials problem, and there are not many groups working on similar projects."


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Iowa State University
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ENERGY TECH
Chemists create vitamin-driven battery
Toronto, Canada (SPX) Aug 05, 2016
A team of University of Toronto chemists has created a battery that stores energy in a biologically derived unit, paving the way for cheaper consumer electronics that are easier on the environment. The battery is similar to many commercially-available high-energy lithium-ion batteries with one important difference. It uses flavin from vitamin B2 as the cathode: the part that stores the ele ... read more


ENERGY TECH
New MIT system can identify how much power is being used by each device in a household

ORNL-led study analyzes electric grid vulnerabilities in extreme weather areas

Carbon-financed cookstove fails to deliver hoped-for benefits in the field

Sweden's 100 percent carbon-free emissions challenge

ENERGY TECH
Chemists create vitamin-driven battery

New catalyst for hydrogen production

Researchers printed energy-producing photographs

New material could advance superconductivity

ENERGY TECH
E.ON starts new wind farm in Texas

Offshore wind the next big thing, industry group says

France's EDF buys Chinese wind energy firm

Scotland commits $26M for low-carbon economy

ENERGY TECH
Russia's First Solar-Powered Satellite Completes Test Flight

Sports stadium harnesses power of the sun

DOE SunShot Initiative support new ASU solar research projects

Ukraine sees solar power as Chernobyl's future

ENERGY TECH
Thousands protest possible China-France nuclear project

Shifting from Russia, Ukraine strikes US nuclear fuel deal

UK ties with China at risk over nuclear plant deal

Tiny creatures prompt Australia to reject uranium mine

ENERGY TECH
Patented bioelectrodes have electrifying taste for waste

The Thai village using poop to power homes

Novel 'repair system' discovered in algae may yield new tools for biotechnology

Biological wizardry ferments carbon monoxide into biofuel

ENERGY TECH
China to expand int'l astronauts exchange

China's Agreement with United Nations to Help Developing Countries Get Access to Space

Chinese tracking ship Yuanwang-7 starts maiden voyage

Chinese mega-telescope obtains data on 7 million stars

ENERGY TECH
U of T researchers reduce climate-warming CO2 to building blocks for fuels

Australia boosts climate science research in u-turn

Severe 2015 Indonesian Fire Season Linked to El Nino Drought

Global heat, sea level hit record highs in 2015




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement