Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
Chemists develop possible cheap battery for grid energy storage
by Staff Writers
Waterloo, Canada (SPX) Aug 29, 2016


File image.

Chemists at the University of Waterloo have developed a long-lasting zinc-ion battery that costs half the price of current lithium-ion batteries and could help enable communities to shift away from traditional power plants and into renewable solar and wind energy production. Professor Linda Nazar and her colleagues from the Faculty of Science at Waterloo made the important discovery, which appears in the journal, Nature Energy.

The battery uses safe, non-flammable, non-toxic materials and a pH-neutral, water-based salt. It consists of a water-based electrolyte, a pillared vanadium oxide positive electrode and an inexpensive metallic zinc negative electrode.

The battery generates electricity through a reversible process called intercalation, where positively-charged zinc ions are oxidized from the zinc metal negative electrode, travel through the electrolyte and insert between the layers of vanadium oxide nanosheets in the positive electrode. This drives the flow of electrons in the external circuit, creating an electrical current. The reverse process occurs on charge.

The cell represents the first demonstration of zinc ion intercalation in a solid state material that satisfies four vital criteria: high reversibility, rate and capacity and no zinc dendrite formation.

It provides more than 1,000 cycles with 80 per cent capacity retention and an estimated energy density of 450 watt-hours per litre. Lithium-ion batteries also operate by intercalation - of lithium ions - but they typically use expensive, flammable, organic electrolytes.

"The worldwide demand for sustainable energy has triggered a search for a reliable, low-cost way to store it," said Nazar, a Canada Research Chair in Solid State Energy Materials and a University Research Professor in the Department of Chemistry. "The aqueous zinc-ion battery we've developed is ideal for this type of application because it's relatively inexpensive and it's inherently safe."

The global market for energy storage is expected to grow to $25 billion in the next 10 years. The bonus for manufacturers is they can produce this zinc battery at low cost because its fabrication does not require special conditions, such as ultra-low humidity or the handling of flammable materials needed for lithium ion batteries.

"The focus used to be on minimizing size and weight for the portable electronics market and cars," said Dipan Kundu, a postdoctoral fellow in Nazar's lab and the paper's first author. "Grid storage needs a different kind of battery and that's given us license to look into different materials."

Water in the electrolyte not only facilitates the movement of zinc ions, it also swells the space between the sheets, like tiers of a wedding cake, giving the zinc just enough room to enter and leave the positive structure as the battery cycles.

The electrode material's nano-scale dimensions and the battery's high-conductivity aqueous electrolyte also improve its cycling life and response times.

Together with researchers at the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research in the U.S., Nazar's team is also investigating multivalent ion intercalation batteries based on Mg2+ in non-aqueous electrolytes.

They were the first to report highly reversible Mg cycling in the TiS2 thiospinel and layered sulfides, which represent the first new highly functional Mg insertion materials reported in more than 15 years. Their papers appeared in Energy and Environmental Science and ACS Energy Letters earlier this year.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Waterloo
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ENERGY TECH
New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost
Los Alamos NM (SPX) Aug 26, 2016
A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge the gap between the operating temperature ranges of two existing types of polymer fuel cells, a breakthrough with the potential to accelerate the commercialization of low-cost fuel cells for automotive and stationary applications. A Los Alamos National Laboratory team, in collaboration with Yoong-Kee ... read more


ENERGY TECH
Economy of energy-hungry India may face headwinds

Summer spells cold showers for Russians as hot water cut

Foreigners barred from buying Australia's largest energy grid

Summer spells cold showers for Russians as hot water cut

ENERGY TECH
New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost

Spherical tokamak as model for next steps in fusion energy

Stretchy supercapacitors power wearable electronics

Chemists develop possible cheap battery for grid energy storage

ENERGY TECH
Annual wind report confirms tech advancements, improved performance, and low energy prices

OX2 wins EPC contract for 112 MW wind power in Norway

Wind power fiercer than expected

E.ON starts new wind farm in Texas

ENERGY TECH
U.S. capital comes up short on solar power

An effective and low-cost solution for storing solar energy

Bubble-wrapped sponge creates steam using sunlight

SLAC, Stanford gadget grabs more solar energy to disinfect water faster

ENERGY TECH
French state, EDF strike deal to close nuclear plant

Russia Unique in Being Able to Use Fast Breeder Reactors in Nuclear Industry

Russia, Egypt to Sign Final Contract to Build Nuclear Plant by Year-End

Pro-nuclear countries making slower progress on climate targets

ENERGY TECH
Biofuels not as 'green' as many think

Biofuels could increase rather than decrease C02 emissions

Scientists solve puzzle of converting gaseous carbon dioxide to fuel

Biochemists describe light-driven conversion of greenhouse gas to fuel

ENERGY TECH
China Sends Country's Largest Carrier Rocket to Launch Base

China unveils Mars probe, rover for ambitious 2020 mission

China Ends Preparatory Work on Long March 5 Next-Generation Rocket Engine

China launches hi-res SAR imaging satellite

ENERGY TECH
Plants less thirsty as climate warms: study

Global climate models do not easily downscale for regional predictions

Humans have caused climate change for 180 years

'Baby, it's hot outside': Why birds sing to eggs




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement