. Energy News .




.
ENERGY TECH
The wireless bicycle brake, a prototype on an exciting mission
by Staff Writers
Saarland, Germany (SPX) Feb 28, 2012

Holger Hermanns, computer science professor at Saarland University, confirmed the reliability of his wireless bicycle brake through mathematical calculations. Credit: Angelika Klein.

At this time, wireless networks are able to brake just one bike, but in the future, the technical elements will be further developed to regulate entire trains as they travel over the lines.

In view of that fact, computer scientists at Saarland University are designing mathematical calculations to check such systems automatically.

The scientists will present their results at stand F34 in hall 26 at the computer fair Cebit. The trade show takes place in Hanover, Germany from March 6 to 10.

Professor Holger Hermanns, who holds the chair of Dependable Systems and Software, and who developed the wireless bicycle brake together with his group, explains: "Wireless networks are never a fail-safe method. That's a fact that's based on a technological background."

Nonetheless, the trend is to set up wireless systems that, like a simple bicycle brake, have to function all the time. "In the field of the future European Train Service, for example, concrete plans already exist," Hermanns reports.

Furthermore, he says that train and airplane experiments are far too sophisticated, and could even endanger the life of human beings in case of malfunction.

Therefore, the Saarland computer scientist's mathematical methods should now verify the correct function and interaction of the components automatically. "The wireless bicycle brake gives us the necessary playground to optimize these methods for operation in much more complex systems," Hermanns adds.

Therefore, his research group examines the brake prototype with algorithms that normally are used in control systems for aircraft or chemical factories.

As a result, they found out that the brake works with 99.9999999999997 percent reliability. "This implies that out of a trillion braking attempts, we have three failures," Hermanns explains and concludes: "That is not perfect, but acceptable."

To brake with the wireless brake, a cyclist needs only clench the rubber grip on the right handle. The more tightly the grip is clenched, the harder the disk brake on the front wheel works. It seems as if a ghost hand is in play, but a combination of several electronic components enables the braking.

Integrated in the rubber grip is a pressure sensor, which activates a sender if a specified pressure threshold is crossed. The sender is integrated in a blue plastic box which is the size of a cigarette packet and is attached to the handlebar.

Its radio signals are sent to a receiver attached at the end of the bicycle's fork. The receiver forwards the signal to an actuator, transforming the radio signal into the mechanical power by which the disk brake is activated.

The electrical energy is supplied by a battery, which is also attached to the bicycle's fork. To enhance reliability, there are additional senders attached to the bicycle. These repeatedly send the same signal.

Its current configuration enables the cruiser bike to brake within 250 milliseconds. This means that at a speed of 30 kilometers per hour, the cyclist has to react two meters before reaching the dangerous situation. But the Saarland University computer scientists are not satisfied with just this functionality.

"It is not difficult to integrate an anti-lock braking system and traction control. That takes only a few adjustments," Hermanns explains.

Researching the wireless bicycle brake was funded within the special research field "Automatic Verification and Analysis of Complex Systems (AVACS)" by the German Research Foundation. Besides Holger Hermanns, several researchers from Saarland University are involved.

These are Professors Sebastian Hack, Markus Blaser, Reinhard Wilhelm, Jan Reineke, Bernd Finkbeiner and Verena Wolf. Professor Kurt Mehlhorn and Christoph Weidenbach of the Max-Planck-Institute for Informatics in Saarbrucken are involved in the project, too.

In 2011, the Research Foundation Group approved about 8.7 million euro, and about 3.5 million inure to the benefit of the Saarland research work. Since 2004, the special research group has been sponsored with approximately 26 million euros, and 9.5 million went to the computer scientists at Saarland University.

A Verified Wireless Safety Critical Hard Real-Time Design.

Related Links
AVACS
Chair of Dependable Systems and Software
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com




.
.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
...
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries






.

. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle



ENERGY TECH
Microbes may be engineered to help trap excess CO2 underground
San Diego, CA (SPX) Feb 27, 2012
In H.G. Wells' classic science-fiction novel, The War of the Worlds, bacteria save the Earth from destruction when the Martian invaders succumb to infections to which humans have become immune through centuries of evolution. If a team led by researchers at Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory's Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) has its way, bacteria - with a little assist ... read more


ENERGY TECH
Controller Announces Bill to Drive Private Sector Energy Retrofits

10 Advantages to Supporting Geothermal Energy

Ireland to sell Bord Gais energy business

Obama defends energy policy

ENERGY TECH
China urges Khartoum to resolve S. Sudan crisis

Nuclear Iran would 'choke' world economy: Israel PM

BP discussing $14 bn settlement: report

TransCanada in new push for US pipeline

ENERGY TECH
Yorkshire officials OK Hull turbine plant

Wind farm on hold over bald eagle concerns

Golden eagles found dead at wind farm

Japan firms plan wind farm near Fukushima: report

ENERGY TECH
Making droplets drop faster

Advanced Solar Photonics Introduces Grid-Tied Inverters to PV Equipment Line

China aims to boost domestic solar sector

SolarCity and Shea Homes Introduce the "No Electric Bill" Home

ENERGY TECH
India slap cases on aid groups over nuclear row: reports

India freezes aid group funds over nuclear protests

Study Confirms Low Levels of Fallout from Fukushima and Enhances Knowledge

India PM blames foreign NGOs for anti-nuclear demos

ENERGY TECH
Green fuel versus black gold

Biofuel said a sustainable fuel source

Plant toughness: Key to cracking biofuels?

Maize hybrid looks promising for biofuel

ENERGY TECH
Launch of China's manned spacecraft Shenzhou-9 scheduled

Shenzhou 9 To Carry 3 Astronauts To Tiangong-1 Space Station

China to launch spacecraft in June: report

Is Shenzhou Unsafe?

ENERGY TECH
EU wants tangible outcome at Rio climate conference

Classic Maya civilization collapse related to modest rainfall reductions

10th century writings give climate clues

Himalayan Sherpas lament climate change devastation


Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

.

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement