Energy News  





. New World Record For A Superconducting Magnet Set At National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

This test coil of a new magnet has set a world record for a magnetic field conducted by a superconducting magnet. The test coil was wound with a high-temperature superconductor called yttrium barium copper oxide, or YBCO. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
by Staff Writers
Tallahassee FL (SPX) Aug 10, 2007
A collaboration between the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University and industry partner SuperPower Inc. has led to a new world record for a magnetic field created by a superconducting magnet. The new record -- 26.8 tesla -- was reached in late July at the magnet lab's High Field Test Facility and brings engineers closer to realizing the National Research Council goal of creating a 30-tesla superconducting magnet.

The development of such a magnet could lead to great advances in physics, biology and chemistry research, as well as significant reductions in the operating costs of many high-field magnets.

The world-record magnet's test coil was wound by Schenectady, N.Y.-based SuperPower with a well-known, high-temperature superconductor called yttrium barium copper oxide, or YBCO. SuperPower develops superconductors such as YBCO and related technologies for the electric power industry. The magnet lab's Applied Superconductivity Center has worked with the company to determine the superconducting and mechanical properties of YBCO and other materials.

"This test demonstrates what we had long hoped -- that YBCO high-temperature superconductors being made now for electric utility applications also have great potential for high-magnetic-field technology," said David Larbalestier, director of the Applied Superconductivity Center and chief materials scientist at the magnet lab. "It seems likely that this conductor technology can be used to make all-superconducting magnets with fields that will soon exceed 30 tesla. This far exceeds the 22- to 23-tesla limit of all previous niobium-based superconducting magnets." (Niobium is the material used to build most superconducting magnets.)

Venkat Selvamanickam, vice president and chief technology officer at SuperPower, said the YBCO wire's potential for application outside the electric power industry has long been in the company's sights.

"We are encouraged by the results of these tests at the magnet lab and look forward to continuing our collaboration to more completely explore the additional possibilities in high field applications," Selvamanickam said.

Scientists have been aware of the amazing properties of YBCO and its potential for magnet technology for 20 years, but only in the past two years has the material become commercially available in the long lengths needed for magnets. Scientists at the magnet lab are interested in the material because at very low temperatures, the conductor is capable of generating very high magnetic fields.

"In principle, YBCO is capable of producing the highest-field superconducting magnets ever possible," said W. Denis Markiewicz, a scientist in the lab's Magnet Science and Technology division. Based on the potential of the material, he said, it's even possible that it could one day produce magnetic fields as high as 50 tesla.

"What we learned from this test really opens the door to imagining that one day we could use superconducting magnets in place of our resistive magnets," he said.

Resistive magnets, primarily used for physics research, are more costly to operate because they are powered by tremendous amounts of electricity, while superconducting magnets require little or no electrical power to run once they are brought up to full field. The magnet lab's annual utility costs to run the magnets are close to $4 million, and the lab consumes 10 percent of the city of Tallahassee's generating capacity.

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory develops and operates state-of-the-art, high-magnetic-field facilities that faculty and visiting scientists and engineers use for research. The laboratory is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the state of Florida. To learn more, visit http://www.magnet.fsu.edu.

SuperPower is a world leader in developing commercially feasible second-generation high-temperature superconductors and related devices designed to enhance the capacity, reliability and quality of electric power transmission and distribution.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Florida State University
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Iraq Oil Deals Signed Under Saddam Up For Review
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Aug 09, 2007
All contracts concluded by foreign oil companies with Saddam Hussein's regime and the Kurdistan authorities will be reviewed in line with Iraq's new legislation, the Iraqi oil minister said Wednesday. "A draft oil law stipulates that any contract concluded with the previous regime or the Kurdistan autonomy must be reviewed and brought in line with the new law," Hussain al-Shahristani said on arrival in Moscow.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • New World Record For A Superconducting Magnet Set At National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
  • Division Of The Caspian
  • Japan Looks To Turn Straw Into Biofuel Amid Price Crunch
  • Nanoparticle Technique Could Lead To Improved Semiconductors

  • World's largest nuke plant closed for 'months'
  • India's PM dares left to withdraw support over US nuclear deal
  • Japan nuclear plant hit by arson wave
  • New Finnish nuclear reactor hits fresh snag

  • Invisible Gases Form Most Organic Haze In Both Urban And Rural Areas
  • BAE Systems Completes Major New Facility For Ionospheric Physics Research
  • NASA Satellite Captures First View Of Night-Shining Clouds
  • Main Component For World Latest Satellite To Measure Greenhouse Gases Delivered

  • Indian State Plants 10 Million Trees In One Day
  • East Africa Battles Deforestation With Butterfly Nets
  • Peru Launches Drive To Regrow Lost Forests And Jungles
  • Increase In Creeping Vines Signals Major Shift In Southern US Forests

  • Conventional Plowing Is Skinning Our Agricultural Fields
  • Chinese Prosperity Will Set Off Global Food Inflation
  • Risk Of Contamination Rises As Global Food System Expands
  • Rivers Recede But Millions Go Hungry In Flooded South Asia

  • Driving Changes For The Car Of The Future
  • Toyota To Delay Launch Of New Hybrids
  • US Should Consider Gas Tax Says Ford Chief
  • GM Sales In China To Hit One Million Vehicles

  • Boeing Flies Blended Wing Body Research Aircraft
  • Steering Aircraft Clear Of Choppy Air
  • EAA AirVenture 2007
  • Sensors May Monitor Aircraft For Defects Continuously

  • Could NASA Get To Pluto Faster? Space Expert Says Yes - By Thinking Nuclear
  • NASA plans to send new robot to Jupiter
  • Los Alamos Hopes To Lead New Era Of Nuclear Space Tranportion With Jovian Mission
  • Boeing Selects Leader for Nuclear Space Systems Program

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement