Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
Hydrogen in your pocket? New plastic for carrying and storing hydrogen
by Staff Writers
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Nov 29, 2016


Ketone (fluorenone) polymer can fix hydrogen via simple electrolytic hydrogenation in water at room temperature and release hydrogen when heated to 80 degrees C. Image courtesy Waseda University. For a larger version of this image please go here.

A Waseda University (Tokyo) research group has developed a polymer which can store hydrogen in a light, compact and flexible sheet, and is safe to touch even when filled with hydrogen gas.

Although research and development on technology allowing hydrogen to become a major energy source have been going on for many years, the conventional methods of storing and carrying hydrogen were accompanied by safety risks such as explosions. Recently, hydrogen-absorbing organic compounds have been studied as storage materials, for their ability to stably store and release hydrogen through chemical bonding.

However, these compounds require vessels or tanks maintained at high pressure and/or temperature and often encounter difficulty in releasing the hydrogen gas. Widespread commercialization of hydrogen as an energy source requires a safer and more efficient system for storing and carrying it.

The research group, led by Professors Hiroyuki Nishide and Kenichi Oyaizu of the Department of Applied Chemistry, developed a ketone (fluorenone) polymer, which can be produced as a thin sheet, and can fix hydrogen via simple electrolytic hydrogenation in water at room temperature.

Furthermore, the fluorenol polymer can release hydrogen when heated to 80 degrees Celsius with an aqueous iridium catalyst. The group proved that under mild conditions the cycle of fixing and releasing hydrogen can be repeated without significant deterioration.

The advantages of the ketone/alcohol polymer include easy handling, moldability, robustness, non-flammability and low toxicity, pointing the way to the development of a light, thin plastic container that can be carried in your pocket. The new material is also expected to contribute to the creation of distributed energy systems, especially in remote areas.

The research results were published in the Nature Communications on September 30.

Research paper: "A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions"


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Waseda University
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ENERGY TECH
Researchers report new thermoelectric material with high power factors
Houston TX (SPX) Nov 17, 2016
With energy conservation expected to play a growing role in managing global demand, materials and methods that make better use of existing sources of energy have become increasingly important. Researchers reported this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that they have demonstrated a step forward in converting waste heat - from industrial smokestacks, power generating pla ... read more


ENERGY TECH
China power plant collapse kills at least 22: Xinhua

Climate: Four nations map course to carbon-free economies

Study: LED lights draw fewer insects

Shifting focus leaves mixed bag for German utility RWE

ENERGY TECH
Glow-in-the-dark dye could fuel liquid-based batteries

Researchers report new thermoelectric material with high power factors

EAST achieves longest steady-state H-mode pperations

First observations of tongue deformation of plasma

ENERGY TECH
Owl-inspired wing design reduces wind turbine noise by 10 decibels

DONG Energy sets wind energy sights on Taiwan

Interior set to rule on future of BLM's Renewable Energy Program

Microsoft Corp. taps deeper into wind power

ENERGY TECH
Tesla microgrid powers entire island with solar in American Samoa

Africa looks to solar for communities off the grid

Sweden to scrap taxes on solar energy in 2017

Tesla shareholders approve merger with SolarCity

ENERGY TECH
Swiss reject speedy nuclear phaseout

Nuclear energy: who's advancing and who's retreating

Breakthrough offers greater understanding of safe radioactive waste disposal

Vietnam scraps huge nuclear power plant projects

ENERGY TECH
Investing in the 'bioeconomy' could create jobs and reduce carbon emissions

Argonne researchers study how reflectivity of biofuel crops impacts climate

UNIST researchers turn waste gas into road-ready diesel fuel

NextCoal to produce bio-coal for export to Japan, bio-oil for domestic use

ENERGY TECH
Material and plant samples retrieved from space experiments

Chinese astronauts return to earth after longest mission

China completes longest manned space mission yet

Chinese astronauts accept 1st earth-space interview

ENERGY TECH
Overheated Arctic sign of climate change 'vicious circle'

Deciphering Trump's mixed signals on climate change

The decline in emissions also has negative implications

Current climate date rescue activities in Australia




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement