Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
FSU professor designs new material to better store hydrogen fuel
by Staff Writers
Tallahassee FL (SPX) Dec 02, 2016


This next-generation design could then be placed in a tank of a car that uses hydrogen for fuel. These new materials are made of Earth abundant elements and therefore are easily available.

A Florida State University researcher has designed new materials that could be used to store hydrogen fuel more efficiently in vehicles or other devices that use clean energy.

Jose Mendoza-Cortes, an assistant professor in the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, describes his proposed solution and designs for these new materials in an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

"There will be many proposals to solve energy issues, and this may be one option," Mendoza-Cortes said. "We wanted to find the most effective way to store hydrogen so that perhaps in the future, cars could use this to run longer distances and more efficiently."

Scientists had already discovered that they needed to pressurize hydrogen to compact it and make it usable as a fuel for cars. But Mendoza-Cortes wanted to take it one step further and make the process more efficient and economically viable.

"We still want to pressurize it, but we want to do it more efficiently," he said. "Right now, it's extremely costly to do this."

Using complex mathematical equations and computer simulations, Mendoza-Cortes designed porous materials of transition metals - compounds involving cobalt, iron or nickel - that cause hydrogen to bond with it.

This next-generation design could then be placed in a tank of a car that uses hydrogen for fuel. These new materials are made of Earth abundant elements and therefore are easily available.

Mendoza-Cortes designed 270 compounds through these simulations and then tested their performance for hydrogen storage.

The idea is that since hydrogen will bind to the actual device, more hydrogen could be packed in and condensed into a tank. Because the hydrogen easily sticks to the device, the tank would never actually reach empty.

Additionally, he found it would take a smaller energy expenditure to fill up the tank.

"In other words, more hydrogen can be stored at lower pressures and room temperature, making some of these materials good for practical use," Mendoza-Cortes said.

As of 2016, three companies have produced hydrogen fuel cars - Toyota, Hyundai and Honda.

Currently, hydrogen can be made into liquid at 1 bar - bar is the unit of measurement for atmospheric pressure - and 20 degrees Kelvin or -423.67 Fahrenheit. At that rate, hydrogen can be stored at 71 grams per liter. While at 700 bar and 298 degrees Kelvin or 76.73 Fahrenheit, hydrogen can be stored at 37 grams per liter.

With Mendoza-Cortes' proposed new materials, hydrogen could be stored at less than 200 bar to fill up the same tank at room temperature, creating a far more efficient system.

"You don't have to spend all that energy to get the same amount of storage," he said.

Mendoza-Cortes came to FSU by way of the Energy and Materials Strategic Faculty Hiring Initiative. He is a researcher at FSU's High-Performance Materials Institute (HPMI), a multidisciplinary research institute dedicated to research and development of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies.


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Florida State University
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ENERGY TECH
Hydrogen in your pocket? New plastic for carrying and storing hydrogen
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Nov 29, 2016
A Waseda University (Tokyo) research group has developed a polymer which can store hydrogen in a light, compact and flexible sheet, and is safe to touch even when filled with hydrogen gas. Although research and development on technology allowing hydrogen to become a major energy source have been going on for many years, the conventional methods of storing and carrying hydrogen were accompa ... read more


ENERGY TECH
China power plant collapse kills at least 22: Xinhua

Climate: Four nations map course to carbon-free economies

Study: LED lights draw fewer insects

Shifting focus leaves mixed bag for German utility RWE

ENERGY TECH
Physicists spell 'AV' by manipulating Abrikosov vortices

Hydrogen in your pocket? New plastic for carrying and storing hydrogen

Glow-in-the-dark dye could fuel liquid-based batteries

Researchers report new thermoelectric material with high power factors

ENERGY TECH
Owl-inspired wing design reduces wind turbine noise by 10 decibels

DONG Energy sets wind energy sights on Taiwan

Interior set to rule on future of BLM's Renewable Energy Program

Microsoft Corp. taps deeper into wind power

ENERGY TECH
EU unveils plans to boost 'clean energy' use

New fabrication technique leads to broader sunlight absorption in plastic solar cells

Sun setting on Japan's solar energy boom

Tesla microgrid powers entire island with solar in American Samoa

ENERGY TECH
'Diamond-age' of power generation as nuclear batteries developed

Nuclear energy: who's advancing and who's retreating

Swiss reject speedy nuclear phaseout

Breakthrough offers greater understanding of safe radioactive waste disposal

ENERGY TECH
Investing in the 'bioeconomy' could create jobs and reduce carbon emissions

Argonne researchers study how reflectivity of biofuel crops impacts climate

UNIST researchers turn waste gas into road-ready diesel fuel

NextCoal to produce bio-coal for export to Japan, bio-oil for domestic use

ENERGY TECH
China launches 4th data relay satellite

Material and plant samples retrieved from space experiments

Chinese astronauts return to earth after longest mission

China completes longest manned space mission yet

ENERGY TECH
Climate model predictions are telling a consistent story

Huge reduction in African dust plume impacted climate 11,000 years ago

Study Sheds New Insights Into Global Warming Trends

Overheated Arctic sign of climate change 'vicious circle'




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement